Beyond Our Walls

John Mix Stanley (1814 – 1872). "The Last of Their Race," 1857. Oil on canvas. Museum Purchase. 5.75.

John Mix Stanley’s “The Last of Their Race,” 1857. 5.75

Beyond Our Walls

It is often said of our namesake, William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, that he brought the West to the world. Continuing that legacy, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West shares its own extraordinary object collection, exhibitions, and expertise beyond our walls with a national—and indeed international—audience.

From the loan of a few artifacts to complete traveling exhibitions, the Center of the West takes the authentic stories of the American West on the road. Here are some of the exhibitions around the country currently featuring objects from the Center.

John Mix Stanley (1814 – 1872). Untitled, Teton Valley Scene, 1855. Oil on canvas. Center of the West museum purchase from William E. Weiss Memorial Fund and Lakeside Foundation. 1.14

John Mix Stanley’s untitled  Teton Valley Scene, 1855. 1.14

Painted Journeys: The Art of John Mix Stanley

  • October 4, 2015 – January 3, 2016: Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • January 20 – May 1, 2016: Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, Washington

Today, 150 years after the Smithsonian gallery housing his paintings burned to the ground, premier painter of the American West John Mix Stanley is receiving a long overdue retrospective.

From Nebraska to the World: Buffalo Bill’s Wild West

  • January 30 – May 1, 2016: Durham Museum, Omaha, Nebraska
Buffalo Bill’s Wild West flag, 1908 season. Gift of Orilla Downing Hollister. 1.69.471

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West flag, 1908 season. 1.69.471

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show introduced many western performers and personalities—as well as a romanticized version of the Old West—to a wide domestic audience and eventually exported that version of American culture around the world.

This exhibition explores the colorful and varied history of the Wild West show, William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, and some of the Wild West performers, like Annie Oakley.

Western Heroes of Pulp Fiction: Dime Novel to Pop Culture

  • October 23, 2015 – February 14, 2016: Tucson Museum of Art, Tucson, Arizona

Bang! Bang! To children and adults alike, the imagined West of shootouts and damsels in distress has been ingrained into the American psyche. This exhibition examines how dime novels, pulp fiction art, comic books, and other forms of visual art created these fictional, often sensational, versions of people, places, and historical events of the West.

James Bama (b. 1926). "Nat Love (Deadwood Dick)," 1969. Oil on board. William E. Weiss Memorial Fund Purchase. 5.04

James Bama (b. 1926). “Nat Love (Deadwood Dick),” 1969.  5.04

Thom Ross (b. 1953 ). "The Virginian," 2001. Acrylic. Gift of the artist. 11.02

Thom Ross (b. 1953 ). “The Virginian,” 2001.  11.02

Frederic Remington (1861 – 1909). "The War Bridle," 1909. Oil on canvas. Gift in memory of A. Barton Hepburn and Cordelia H. Cushman. 8.12

Frederic Remington (1861 – 1909). “The War Bridle,” 1909.  8.12

Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West

  • November 14, 2015 – April 17, 2016: Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska
  • November 2016 – April 2017: Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, California

Few aspects of American history have had a more lasting impact than the exploration and settlement of the western frontier.

Go West! considers evolving notions of the American West through 90 paintings, sculptures, and American Indian artifacts created between the 1830s and the 1920s—from the West’s earliest visual history to the creation of its powerful romantic legacy.

Alfred Jacob Miller (1810 – 1874). "Trappers Saluting the Wind River Mountains," 1864. Oil on canvas. Gift of the Coe Foundation. 10.70

Alfred Jacob Miller (1810 – 1874). “Trappers Saluting the Wind River Mountains,” 1864. 10.70